it is not the answer that enlightens, but the question.

Posts tagged ‘youth’

april 22

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The first Earth Day was held on April 22, 1970. This year, reports indicate more than one billion people from 195 countries participated in Earth Day activities focusing on education, public policy, and consumer efforts. Earth Day 2017 coincided with the first March for Science, a celebration and call to action to promote the importance of science and to encourage education, communication, and ties of mutual respect between scientists and communities. 

As we approach the 50th anniversary of the launch of Earth Day, the Network is striving to broaden the definition of “environment” to include issues that affect health and communities, such as greening schools and jobs, and promoting activism to eliminate air and water pollution – all based on science!

This past Saturday, I was glad to have the opportunity to participate in this important day in conjunction with my local AAUW Tech Savvy event. Tech Savvy is a daylong science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) conference designed to attract middle school girls into STEM careers. Our keynote speaker encouraged participants to keep asking why? It was educational and a blast…! 

-|- Doctor for a Day -|- Water Quality Matters  -|- 

-|- Did you say bone saw?? -|- Hooray for Science! -|- 

add to the good in the world – gs

This year’s Children’s Literature Hawaiʻi (CLH) conference was fantastic! As I mentioned in an earlier post, Graham Salisbury and Steve Jenkins were featured guests. Activities kicked off downtown at the Tenney Theatre with the Honolulu Theatre for Youth (HTY) offering dynamic performances based on Salisbury’s Calvin Coconut series and a medley of Jenkin’s work. This was a fun event for all ages, which was followed by a lively Q & A.

During his keynote on the first day of the conference, Salisbury discussed his work and offered some words of wisdom to those of us working with young people – including the title of this post. He also encouraged us to embrace our passion and write about what we want to know. Finally, he reminded us that writing is a wonderful activity for developing understanding, whether we publish or not.

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Graham Salisbury meets with students in the Books and Media for Children course

Jenkins’ keynote the second morning was beautiful, literally beautiful. He shared many creations from his books including some unpublished works, talked about visual literacy and discussed his passion for making science accessible.

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Steve Jenkins starts off day two.

In addition to the opening and the keynotes, 25 sessions featuring diverse content were offered – everything from writing poetry to illustrating nature to dystopian books to the Nēnē Award. My favorite session was A5 – Deaf Poe, Ed Chevy Interpreting Poe in ASL.

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Ed Chevy, Storyteller Extraordinaire

Chevy is a talented storyteller who recounted Poe’s Fall of the House of Usher. In addition to his magnificent performance, which was translated into spoken English by Kevin Roddy, Chevy discussed his process of preparation including visualizing, imagining the context and characters, and learning about the author. He also talked about incorporating facial expression, body language, and signs harmoniously to make stories come alive.

Sunday Morning Meetings

Last year, I was invited to serve on the Children’s Literature Hawaiʻi (CLH) Conference Steering Committee. This dynamic and dedicated team includes academics, artists, authors, librarians, teachers, and other community leaders. We gather regularly to discuss myriad details involved in planning the biennial conference. Given everyone’s busy schedules, in order to avoid conflicts, our group meets on Sunday mornings.

CLH’s mission describes our core belief that, “literature should be a primary part of every child’s education.” As such, “CLH promotes opportunities to experience, interpret, and create children’s literature through activities such as reading, storytelling, art, drama, song, and scholarly discussion.

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Conference Logo by Steve Jenkins

Organizers and participants have been working to fulfill this mission since 1982. Our current conference theme is Imagining Worlds, Fictional & Real. Conference activities span three days in June . The main conference is held on Oʻahu at Chaminade University. This year, there is also a mini-conference on Maui. Events kick off on June 9 – including an evening festival at the Tenney Theatre, home of Honolulu Theatre for Youth (HTY). June 10-11 are full conference days featuring three strands of presentations:

  • Interpreting literature – reading children’s literature
  • Using literature – activities for home, school, and at the library
  • Creating literature – production and publishing

There are also special sessions for families and a teen track designed to encourage creativity among youth. The 2016 featured author is Graham Salisbury, whose works include Under the Blood Red Sun. The featured illustrator is Steve Jenkins, whose beautiful books bring science to life.

Registration for this not-to-be-missed conference is free – and will be available soon!

midwinter wonders

little free library  http://littlefreelibrary.org

little free library
http://littlefreelibrary.org

ten thousand or so librarians recently gathered for the american library association (ALA) midwinter meeting in chicago. along with wondrous wintery weather, we enjoyed many marvelous meetings. here are a few faves: 

day of diversity 

leading in times of crisis

youth media awards – look at some awesome award winners… 

brown girl dreamingcrossovermorris micklewhite and the tangerine dressthis one summer

…and check out more details on twitter (#alamw15) and other blog reviews

in addition to conference sessions, there were opportunities to explore local resources. que(e)ry librarians  sponsored a field trip to the leather archives and museum located in rogers park. archivist/collections librarian, Jakob VanLammeren, led us on a tour of this amazing organization, dedicated to the collection, preservation, study and interpretation of historical materials in all formats relating to the leather/levi and fetish lifestyles and communities. outstanding…!

leather museum and archive

que(e)ry librarians @ LA&M

a lot of beauty

beautiful place, beautiful and talented youth @ berens river, manitoba

via CBC

 

a queer library alliance for young people: using books with LGBTQ content

On June 6, my friend and colleague Thaddeus Andracki and I spoke about queer issues and materials—especially in libraries and especially relating to local issues in Hawai‘i at the Children’s Literature Hawai‘i Seventeenth Biennial Conference at Chaminade University in Honolulu.

Here’s the abstract describing the three areas we discussed:

We review options for selecting materials with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer/Questioning (GLBTQ) content to support personal and community goals. We look at challenges to providing access to queer materials. Finally, we consider possibilities to develop collections and programming with GLBTQ content aligned with emerging needs of children and young adults. Presenters will offer ideas and incorporate examples to encourage participants to share knowledge and engage in open discussion throughout the session.

We were very pleased with participant engagement. More details including slides are available at Tad’s blog.

rae and tad sharing some favorite reads at children’s literature hawai’i conference 2014

youth community inquiry

Youth Community Inquiry: New Media for Community and Personal Growth offers a detailed look at how people use media to help their communities thrive.

I was pleased to contribute to this anthology via a chapter on early work at the Champaign County Juvenile Detention Center Library, co-written with Jeanie Austin and Joe Coyle. Here’s an excerpt:

Youth in juvenile detention face many challenges. Access to information relevant to their experience through library services offers an opportunity to forge connections and move past hurdles. Linking resources with youth’s questions and concerns provides examples of new possibilities and facilitates a reduction of alienation. Involving collaborators and mentors-especially peers-in developing services enables a strong model of collaboration.

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