it is not the answer that enlightens, but the question.

Posts tagged ‘literacy’

E Noelo I Ka ‘Ike

E Noelo I Ka ‘Ike, To Search for Knowledge, is an exciting project designed to counter a lack of awareness, access to, and competency engaging with Hawaiian resources. Team members work with librarians, other educators, and directly with students to teach information literacy and introduce culturally relevant resources.

The 2017 Native Hawaiian Education Convention (NHEA), hosted at the beautiful Windward Community College (WCC) Campus, included a E Noelo I Ka ‘Ike session to teach about databases and search strategies to retrieve information for professional and personal use including genealogy, Hawaiian language, hula, land, and more.  

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Tuti Kanahele describes options for making Kahili.

Participants also recognized outstanding educators and enjoyed keynotes on topics of current interest such as the amazing Hōkūleʻa voyage and Hawaiian films. Producer Beau Bassett gave an update on Out of State, a documentary exploring the lives of a group of Hawaiian inmates living far from home. There were hands-on workshops too –  such as Pena Kiʻi i Keahiakahoe, observation, mo’olelo and mele of the area in conjunction with painting of one of O’ahu’s most famous mountains; and Kahili paʻa lima, the art of feather making.

 

add to the good in the world – gs

This year’s Children’s Literature Hawaiʻi (CLH) conference was fantastic! As I mentioned in an earlier post, Graham Salisbury and Steve Jenkins were featured guests. Activities kicked off downtown at the Tenney Theatre with the Honolulu Theatre for Youth (HTY) offering dynamic performances based on Salisbury’s Calvin Coconut series and a medley of Jenkin’s work. This was a fun event for all ages, which was followed by a lively Q & A.

During his keynote on the first day of the conference, Salisbury discussed his work and offered some words of wisdom to those of us working with young people – including the title of this post. He also encouraged us to embrace our passion and write about what we want to know. Finally, he reminded us that writing is a wonderful activity for developing understanding, whether we publish or not.

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Graham Salisbury meets with students in the Books and Media for Children course

Jenkins’ keynote the second morning was beautiful, literally beautiful. He shared many creations from his books including some unpublished works, talked about visual literacy and discussed his passion for making science accessible.

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Steve Jenkins starts off day two.

In addition to the opening and the keynotes, 25 sessions featuring diverse content were offered – everything from writing poetry to illustrating nature to dystopian books to the Nēnē Award. My favorite session was A5 – Deaf Poe, Ed Chevy Interpreting Poe in ASL.

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Ed Chevy, Storyteller Extraordinaire

Chevy is a talented storyteller who recounted Poe’s Fall of the House of Usher. In addition to his magnificent performance, which was translated into spoken English by Kevin Roddy, Chevy discussed his process of preparation including visualizing, imagining the context and characters, and learning about the author. He also talked about incorporating facial expression, body language, and signs harmoniously to make stories come alive.

occupy the syllabi

the white male canon is not sufficient for theorizing the lives of marginalized people…

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count the readings authored by white males and those authored by the majority of humanity. then ask yourself: are your identities and the identities of people you love reflected on these syllabi? whose perspectives and life experiences are excluded? is it really worth it to accumulate debt for such an epistemically poor education?

dailycal.org/2015/01/20/occupy-syllabus

youth community inquiry

Youth Community Inquiry: New Media for Community and Personal Growth offers a detailed look at how people use media to help their communities thrive.

I was pleased to contribute to this anthology via a chapter on early work at the Champaign County Juvenile Detention Center Library, co-written with Jeanie Austin and Joe Coyle. Here’s an excerpt:

Youth in juvenile detention face many challenges. Access to information relevant to their experience through library services offers an opportunity to forge connections and move past hurdles. Linking resources with youth’s questions and concerns provides examples of new possibilities and facilitates a reduction of alienation. Involving collaborators and mentors-especially peers-in developing services enables a strong model of collaboration.

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wild about reading @ your zoo

The inaugural Wild About Reading was a hoot! Authors, librarians, and storytellers spent the day reading tons of animal-themed books to children visiting the zoo. This lively event was hosted by Children’s Literature Hawaii, the Hawaii State Public Library System and the Honolulu Zoo Society.

Sue Cowing, Vicky Dworkin and Rae Montague at Wild About Reading

Learn more via Hawaii Public Radio.

metablog

blogging

according to wikipedia, the term weblog was coined by jorn barger on 17 december 1997. the short form, blog, was coined by peter merholz, who jokingly broke the word weblog into the phrase we blog in the sidebar of his blog peterme.com in 1999. shortly thereafter, evan williams at pyra labs used blog as both a noun and verb (to blog, meaning to edit one’s weblog or to post to one’s weblog) and devised the term blogger in connection with pyra labs’ blogger product, leading to the popularization of the terms.

web logs (blogs) have been popular in many contexts for decades. the function as open journals. some are very specific, others more general. they afford flexibility to share ideas of all sorts. content + network. there are hundreds of millions of blogs: personal, organizational, mixed-media, photo, video (vlog), micro, etc.

blogging facilitates literacy, or the ability to identify, understand, interpret, create, communicate and compute, using printed and written materials associated with varying contexts. literacy involves a continuum of learning in enabling individuals to achieve their goals, to develop their knowledge and potential, and to participate fully in their community and wider society.

blogs are components of learning communities. according to a recent study of 100 academic blogs in the uk, usa, canada, and australia, bloggers mainly share ideas of interest to peers – 73% of content was geared for other academics, while 38% was for interested professional readers.  in terms of content, 41% focus on academic cultural critique (e.g., comments funding and policy), 40% on research, and other topics (e.g., academic practice, tech help, career advice, etc.). our ideas are open for review, critique, exchange  and extension.