it is not the answer that enlightens, but the question.

Posts tagged ‘incarceration’

E Noelo I Ka ‘Ike

E Noelo I Ka ‘Ike, To Search for Knowledge, is an exciting project designed to counter a lack of awareness, access to, and competency engaging with Hawaiian resources. Team members work with librarians, other educators, and directly with students to teach information literacy and introduce culturally relevant resources.

The 2017 Native Hawaiian Education Convention (NHEA), hosted at the beautiful Windward Community College (WCC) Campus, included a E Noelo I Ka ‘Ike session to teach about databases and search strategies to retrieve information for professional and personal use including genealogy, Hawaiian language, hula, land, and more.  

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Tuti Kanahele describes options for making Kahili.

Participants also recognized outstanding educators and enjoyed keynotes on topics of current interest such as the amazing Hōkūleʻa voyage and Hawaiian films. Producer Beau Bassett gave an update on Out of State, a documentary exploring the lives of a group of Hawaiian inmates living far from home. There were hands-on workshops too –  such as Pena Kiʻi i Keahiakahoe, observation, mo’olelo and mele of the area in conjunction with painting of one of O’ahu’s most famous mountains; and Kahili paʻa lima, the art of feather making.

 

youth community inquiry

Youth Community Inquiry: New Media for Community and Personal Growth offers a detailed look at how people use media to help their communities thrive.

I was pleased to contribute to this anthology via a chapter on early work at the Champaign County Juvenile Detention Center Library, co-written with Jeanie Austin and Joe Coyle. Here’s an excerpt:

Youth in juvenile detention face many challenges. Access to information relevant to their experience through library services offers an opportunity to forge connections and move past hurdles. Linking resources with youth’s questions and concerns provides examples of new possibilities and facilitates a reduction of alienation. Involving collaborators and mentors-especially peers-in developing services enables a strong model of collaboration.

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’tis the season for book awards

In the world of books, these are exciting times. Many awards are announced during the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting. This excitement reaches far and wide via social media as well as mass media – and as committees announce their recommendation lists and top picks.  From time to time, new awards emerge too. Other groups involved with book reviews also share fun favorites and offer suggestions for special populations such as young people living in poverty, on the streets, and/or in custody.

In 2014, the American Indian Library Association announced the recipients of their Youth Literature Awards – presented ever other year. These texts are particularly important as they provide opportunities to consider current and historical issues that are often portrayed through dominant perspectives.

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Award-winning books and their reviews are enjoyable to read. That said, even our award winners may harbor dominant perspectives as evidenced by this year’s Caldecott Medalist, Locomotive.

Congratulations to all the authors, illustrators, publishers, reviewers, librarians, parents, teachers, and others who contribute to the joy of books!

can you tell me how to get to sesame street?

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Sesame Street debuted November 10, 1969. Researchers at UW-Madison recently analyzed Sesame Street’s positive effects across a number of learning outcomes: cognitive (including literacy and numeracy), learning about the world (including health and safety knowledge), and social reasoning and attitudes. Sesame Street has a global reach of at least 156 million children in the 0-7 age range.

Forty-four years after its inception, Sesame Street continues to look for ways to connect with and support children in all sorts of circumstances. Earlier this year, it introduced a tool kit on incarceration–and Alex, the first Sesame Street character who has a parent in jail.