it is not the answer that enlightens, but the question.

Posts tagged ‘hawai’i’

if i can bicycle, i bicycle

 

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ko‘olau range

mānoa valley, on the island of oʻahu, is beautiful in myriad ways – rich in history and intriguing spaces

the neighborhood is also home to cycle mānoa, an awesome community-based organization dedicated to promoting bike culture.  

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rebuilding

founded in 2008, cycle mānoa is a volunteer organization that supports and enables cycling on campus and throughout the island. participants offer bike repairs for students, and the general public, for free, and parts at cost, as well as hands-on learning of bike repair. donations welcome.

 

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the garden isle

I recently had the opportunity to travel to the oldest of the main Hawaiian islands, Kauaʻi, and visit Lāwa`i Kai, also known as Allerton Garden. Having spent time at the Allerton Gardens in Monticello, IL, it was incredible to see and learn about this other magical place –  where nature and human creativity come together.

1. Pineapple statue 2. Diana’s Fountain and reflection pool 3. Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla) as seen in Jurassic Park 4. Bronze Mermaid 5.Buddha statue amid golden bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) 6. Rooster and rooster statues 7. Allerton residence featuring wraparound lanai

Allerton Garden is part of the National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG), a not-for-profit institution dedicated to tropical plant research, conservation, and education. NTBG also sponsors the Breadfruit Institute, which promotes the use of breadfruit for food and reforestation.

 

 

add to the good in the world – gs

This year’s Children’s Literature Hawaiʻi (CLH) conference was fantastic! As I mentioned in an earlier post, Graham Salisbury and Steve Jenkins were featured guests. Activities kicked off downtown at the Tenney Theatre with the Honolulu Theatre for Youth (HTY) offering dynamic performances based on Salisbury’s Calvin Coconut series and a medley of Jenkin’s work. This was a fun event for all ages, which was followed by a lively Q & A.

During his keynote on the first day of the conference, Salisbury discussed his work and offered some words of wisdom to those of us working with young people – including the title of this post. He also encouraged us to embrace our passion and write about what we want to know. Finally, he reminded us that writing is a wonderful activity for developing understanding, whether we publish or not.

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Graham Salisbury meets with students in the Books and Media for Children course

Jenkins’ keynote the second morning was beautiful, literally beautiful. He shared many creations from his books including some unpublished works, talked about visual literacy and discussed his passion for making science accessible.

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Steve Jenkins starts off day two.

In addition to the opening and the keynotes, 25 sessions featuring diverse content were offered – everything from writing poetry to illustrating nature to dystopian books to the Nēnē Award. My favorite session was A5 – Deaf Poe, Ed Chevy Interpreting Poe in ASL.

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Ed Chevy, Storyteller Extraordinaire

Chevy is a talented storyteller who recounted Poe’s Fall of the House of Usher. In addition to his magnificent performance, which was translated into spoken English by Kevin Roddy, Chevy discussed his process of preparation including visualizing, imagining the context and characters, and learning about the author. He also talked about incorporating facial expression, body language, and signs harmoniously to make stories come alive.

wearable art

the uhm department of art and art history is sponsoring wearable art in the commons gallery from march 29-april 8.  it is a very eye-catching exhibit.

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my tastes are biased – and so sheanae tam’s library catalog cards gown is my favorite…

…but all of the designs are really interesting and fun!

ART 336 Wearable Art—Body and Material Studio exploration of clothing as art form and the body as living armature and performance. Emphasis on development of concept, skill, collaborative and individual voice through material investigation, research, discussions, lectures, individual and group projects – with Madeleine Söder and students: Nicholas Bright, Ariel Del Rosario, Melissa Franklin, Cara Jean Kamehiro, Sarah Lambert, Sheanae Tam, Janet Tran, and Douglas Young

Sunday Morning Meetings

Last year, I was invited to serve on the Children’s Literature Hawaiʻi (CLH) Conference Steering Committee. This dynamic and dedicated team includes academics, artists, authors, librarians, teachers, and other community leaders. We gather regularly to discuss myriad details involved in planning the biennial conference. Given everyone’s busy schedules, in order to avoid conflicts, our group meets on Sunday mornings.

CLH’s mission describes our core belief that, “literature should be a primary part of every child’s education.” As such, “CLH promotes opportunities to experience, interpret, and create children’s literature through activities such as reading, storytelling, art, drama, song, and scholarly discussion.

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Conference Logo by Steve Jenkins

Organizers and participants have been working to fulfill this mission since 1982. Our current conference theme is Imagining Worlds, Fictional & Real. Conference activities span three days in June . The main conference is held on Oʻahu at Chaminade University. This year, there is also a mini-conference on Maui. Events kick off on June 9 – including an evening festival at the Tenney Theatre, home of Honolulu Theatre for Youth (HTY). June 10-11 are full conference days featuring three strands of presentations:

  • Interpreting literature – reading children’s literature
  • Using literature – activities for home, school, and at the library
  • Creating literature – production and publishing

There are also special sessions for families and a teen track designed to encourage creativity among youth. The 2016 featured author is Graham Salisbury, whose works include Under the Blood Red Sun. The featured illustrator is Steve Jenkins, whose beautiful books bring science to life.

Registration for this not-to-be-missed conference is free – and will be available soon!

UHM LIS Program celebrates 50th anniversary!

UHM LIS Program Week Proclamation

UHM LIS Program Week Proclamation Ceremony with Governor Ige – https://www.flickr.com/photos/govhawaii/sets/72157656293463714

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (UHM) Library and Information Science (LIS) program turns 50 this year. In recognition of this milestone, this week has been officially proclaimed UHM LIS Program Week!

As noted in the proclamation, our theme is Information Horizons – an overarching rainbow of possibilities and opportunities for information professionals. In line with this theme, we hosted a lecture to reflect on our ideas and actions, which emphasized engagement in the Asia-Pacific region. Dean Emeritus Miles Jackson (1975-1995) was the featured speaker.

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Dean Emeritus Miles M. Jackson met with students, alumni, and faculty following the inaugural Information Horizons lecture.

A recording of the lecture will soon be available on the website – hawaii.edu/lis.   Read more about the celebrations at UH News.

#weneeddiversebooks and more

 

Dr. Debbie Reese of American Indians in Children’s Literature visited Hawaiʻi in March 2015 to offer the keynote lecture at the Hawaiʻi Association of School Librarians (HASL) Spring Conference. 

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HASL Spring 2015 Conference Flier

During the HASL talk and at other sessions with school and public librarians and LIS students, Dr. Reese shared insights aligned with the #WeNeedDiverseBooks initiative. In particular, Reese discussed the misrepresentation of American Indians in children’s literature that obscures the diversity that exists across 566 federally recognized sovereign tribal nations. Read more about these issues here.

Mahalo nui loa Dr. Reese and all HASL conference organizers, speakers, and participants for sharing outstanding work.

Liko Hoe @ HASL Spring Conference (WCC)

via Twitter – #HASL2015