it is not the answer that enlightens, but the question.

Posts tagged ‘community’

april 22

atom

The first Earth Day was held on April 22, 1970. This year, reports indicate more than one billion people from 195 countries participated in Earth Day activities focusing on education, public policy, and consumer efforts. Earth Day 2017 coincided with the first March for Science, a celebration and call to action to promote the importance of science and to encourage education, communication, and ties of mutual respect between scientists and communities. 

As we approach the 50th anniversary of the launch of Earth Day, the Network is striving to broaden the definition of “environment” to include issues that affect health and communities, such as greening schools and jobs, and promoting activism to eliminate air and water pollution – all based on science!

This past Saturday, I was glad to have the opportunity to participate in this important day in conjunction with my local AAUW Tech Savvy event. Tech Savvy is a daylong science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) conference designed to attract middle school girls into STEM careers. Our keynote speaker encouraged participants to keep asking why? It was educational and a blast…! 

-|- Doctor for a Day -|- Water Quality Matters  -|- 

-|- Did you say bone saw?? -|- Hooray for Science! -|- 

Advertisements

if i can bicycle, i bicycle

 

240px-Manoa-valley-01

ko‘olau range

mānoa valley, on the island of oʻahu, is beautiful in myriad ways – rich in history and intriguing spaces

the neighborhood is also home to cycle mānoa, an awesome community-based organization dedicated to promoting bike culture.  

B_cycle

rebuilding

founded in 2008, cycle mānoa is a volunteer organization that supports and enables cycling on campus and throughout the island. participants offer bike repairs for students, and the general public, for free, and parts at cost, as well as hands-on learning of bike repair. donations welcome.

 

the garden isle

I recently had the opportunity to travel to the oldest of the main Hawaiian islands, Kauaʻi, and visit Lāwa`i Kai, also known as Allerton Garden. Having spent time at the Allerton Gardens in Monticello, IL, it was incredible to see and learn about this other magical place –  where nature and human creativity come together.

1. Pineapple statue 2. Diana’s Fountain and reflection pool 3. Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla) as seen in Jurassic Park 4. Bronze Mermaid 5.Buddha statue amid golden bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) 6. Rooster and rooster statues 7. Allerton residence featuring wraparound lanai

Allerton Garden is part of the National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG), a not-for-profit institution dedicated to tropical plant research, conservation, and education. NTBG also sponsors the Breadfruit Institute, which promotes the use of breadfruit for food and reforestation.

 

 

topics in dance

i had the opportunity to participate in a topics in dance course this spring. DNCE 459: The Art of Drag Performance, offered by UHM, was certainly one of the most interesting and fun courses i have ever attended.  

we considered theory and history, delved into styles and approaches,  created costumes and performed!  our instructor was the always fabulous Cocoa Chandelier

 ♥ | ♥ | ♥ | ♥  | ♥ | ♥  | ♥ | ♥  | ♥ | ♥ 

Sunday Morning Meetings

Last year, I was invited to serve on the Children’s Literature Hawaiʻi (CLH) Conference Steering Committee. This dynamic and dedicated team includes academics, artists, authors, librarians, teachers, and other community leaders. We gather regularly to discuss myriad details involved in planning the biennial conference. Given everyone’s busy schedules, in order to avoid conflicts, our group meets on Sunday mornings.

CLH’s mission describes our core belief that, “literature should be a primary part of every child’s education.” As such, “CLH promotes opportunities to experience, interpret, and create children’s literature through activities such as reading, storytelling, art, drama, song, and scholarly discussion.

image

Conference Logo by Steve Jenkins

Organizers and participants have been working to fulfill this mission since 1982. Our current conference theme is Imagining Worlds, Fictional & Real. Conference activities span three days in June . The main conference is held on Oʻahu at Chaminade University. This year, there is also a mini-conference on Maui. Events kick off on June 9 – including an evening festival at the Tenney Theatre, home of Honolulu Theatre for Youth (HTY). June 10-11 are full conference days featuring three strands of presentations:

  • Interpreting literature – reading children’s literature
  • Using literature – activities for home, school, and at the library
  • Creating literature – production and publishing

There are also special sessions for families and a teen track designed to encourage creativity among youth. The 2016 featured author is Graham Salisbury, whose works include Under the Blood Red Sun. The featured illustrator is Steve Jenkins, whose beautiful books bring science to life.

Registration for this not-to-be-missed conference is free – and will be available soon!

DocuQueer CFP

Screen Shot 2015-12-18 at 3.31.16 PM

IFLA Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning (LGBTQ) Users Special Interest Group (SIG) is hosting a conference! 

Sessions will include keynotes and tours of some of the most fabulous collections in the world as well as presentations by local librarians and archivists and international speakers.

The LGBTQ Users SIG is now seeking submissions for presentations. Please share your critical understanding and/or innovative approaches to meeting the informational needs of LGBTQ individuals and communities. 

More info: http://2016.ifla.org/cfp-calls/lgbtq-users-special-interest-group

Excellence in Teaching Award

I am very honored to be nominated for an Excellence in Teaching Award based on significant contributions to teaching and student learning.

This year of teaching has been particularly wonderful because I developed and taught a new graduate LIS course in Community Engagement. This course was designed to explore how information professionals in libraries and other settings collaborate with community members and organizations. It considers theory and practice emphasizing critical analysis of policies, services and trends.

One class assignment involved a semester-long investigation to explore local initiatives. Students connected with organizations to consider community needs and the potential role of LIS in meeting them. For example, one group looked at role of libraries in strengthening the capacities of indigenous peoples and the protection of cultures. Another focused on the availability of programs to foster literacy for young children. A third looked at resources to support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) community members. For their final project, students created a poster to present at the state library conference, which offered the opportunity to extend their understanding through exchange with professional colleagues. This year’s conference theme was, fittingly, Building Community: Opportunities, Challenges, and Innovations. Student posters were also deposited in the institutional repository, ScholarSpace.

Community Engagement students enjoying Banned Books Week Read Out