it is not the answer that enlightens, but the question.

Posts tagged ‘canada’

what is the hardest for some does not exist for others

brick walls: racism and other hard histories – dr. sara ahmed

http://vimeo.com/channels/837905/110952481

wall

things are fluid if you’re going the way things are flowing.

via 14th Annual Critical Race and AntiColonial Studies ConferenceUnsettling Conversations, Unmaking Racisms and Colonialisms, at the University of Alberta in Edmonton cohosted by the Centre for World Indigenous Knowledge & Research at Athabasca University, 18 October 2014. 

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how lesbians invented the internet and other stories from toronto

lesbian_categories

 

On October 18, the University of Toronto Faculty of Information hosted Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium. This event enabled lively discussion around many of the topics explored in the Feminist and Queer Information Studies Reader‘s 27 essays, which situate the field of Information Studies into critical conversation with studies of gender, sexuality, race, and technology. Here is an excerpt from the Colloquium description:

Perhaps more than any other discipline, information studies confronts the theoretical with the material. From the collections we build to the access tools we design to the histories we collect, catalog, and preserve, information studies theorists and practitioners are always engaged in the projects of making and being made.

Scholars presented on many exciting projects including The Circle of Lesbian Indexers, Feminist Porn, and Black LGBTQ Brilliance. Check out the full schedule here and learn more about what was shared via Twitter – #gsisc2014.

a lot of beauty

beautiful place, beautiful and talented youth @ berens river, manitoba

via CBC

 

books as building blocks

books

Librarians are charged to develop collections and provide access to materials. Weeding is an essential aspect of this process. While specific criteria vary, weeding policies are usually based on circulation, physical condition, and accuracy. In order to reduce waste, discarded books are often resold, donated, or recycled. As LJ reported, Dalhousie University Libraries recently partnered with a local community resource center to repurpose their discards in an innovative way.

The Blockhouse School Project is based on principles of permaculture: caring for the earth and people via sustainable systems. Dal delivered 10,000 discarded books to the Blockhouse School to use in insulating the building. They were stacked into a wall of books and covered with a mixture of clay, sand, and straw.

Blockhouse School also hosted a New Life for Old Books exhibit and asked community members to develop more repurposing ideas via art, craft, garden, construction, installations, performance — anything else you can think of!