it is not the answer that enlightens, but the question.

topics in dance

i had the opportunity to participate in a topics in dance course this spring. DNCE 459: The Art of Drag Performance, offered by UHM, was certainly one of the most interesting and fun courses i have ever attended.  

we considered theory and history, delved into styles and approaches,  created costumes and performed!  our instructor was the always fabulous Cocoa Chandelier

 ♥ | ♥ | ♥ | ♥  | ♥ | ♥  | ♥ | ♥  | ♥ | ♥ 

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wearable art

the uhm department of art and art history is sponsoring wearable art in the commons gallery from march 29-april 8.  it is a very eye-catching exhibit.

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my tastes are biased – and so sheanae tam’s library catalog cards gown is my favorite…

…but all of the designs are really interesting and fun!

ART 336 Wearable Art—Body and Material Studio exploration of clothing as art form and the body as living armature and performance. Emphasis on development of concept, skill, collaborative and individual voice through material investigation, research, discussions, lectures, individual and group projects – with Madeleine Söder and students: Nicholas Bright, Ariel Del Rosario, Melissa Franklin, Cara Jean Kamehiro, Sarah Lambert, Sheanae Tam, Janet Tran, and Douglas Young

Last year, I was invited to serve on the Children’s Literature Hawaiʻi (CLH) Conference Steering Committee. This dynamic and dedicated team includes academics, artists, authors, librarians, teachers, and other community leaders. We gather regularly to discuss myriad details involved in planning the biennial conference. Given everyone’s busy schedules, in order to avoid conflicts, our group meets on Sunday mornings.

CLH’s mission describes our core belief that, “literature should be a primary part of every child’s education.” As such, “CLH promotes opportunities to experience, interpret, and create children’s literature through activities such as reading, storytelling, art, drama, song, and scholarly discussion.

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Conference Logo by Steve Jenkins

Organizers and participants have been working to fulfill this mission since 1982. Our current conference theme is Imagining Worlds, Fictional & Real. Conference activities span three days in June . The main conference is held on Oʻahu at Chaminade University. This year, there is also a mini-conference on Maui. Events kick off on June 9 – including an evening festival at the Tenney Theatre, home of Honolulu Theatre for Youth (HTY). June 10-11 are full conference days featuring three strands of presentations:

  • Interpreting literature – reading children’s literature
  • Using literature – activities for home, school, and at the library
  • Creating literature – production and publishing

There are also special sessions for families and a teen track designed to encourage creativity among youth. The 2016 featured author is Graham Salisbury, whose works include Under the Blood Red Sun. The featured illustrator is Steve Jenkins, whose beautiful books bring science to life.

Registration for this not-to-be-missed conference is free – and will be available soon!

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check out more wonder woman wear here

DocuQueer CFP

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IFLA Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning (LGBTQ) Users Special Interest Group (SIG) is hosting a conference! 

Sessions will include keynotes and tours of some of the most fabulous collections in the world as well as presentations by local librarians and archivists and international speakers.

The LGBTQ Users SIG is now seeking submissions for presentations. Please share your critical understanding and/or innovative approaches to meeting the informational needs of LGBTQ individuals and communities. 

More info: http://2016.ifla.org/cfp-calls/lgbtq-users-special-interest-group

The American Association of School Librarians hosted the 17th National Conference, experience, education, evolution, in Columbus, OH from November 5-8. The gathering featured many informative sessions including a keynote by Caldecott Medal-winning author Brian Selznick on the power of stories. Selznick’s newest creation, The Marvels, shows how fiction is often better at telling the truth than facts.

The IdeaLab was another fantastic event showcasing effective practices. Computer monitors were set up for presentations on tables around a large room and participants browsed topics of interest.

AASL IdeaLab 2015

IdeaLab, AASL National Conference, Columbus, OH, November 5, 2015

I hosted a space at the IdeaLab on LGBTQ Inclusion @ Your Library. Several hundred librarians stopped by to discuss strategies for effective collection development, curriculum connections, programming, and special events. As with other library events, participants’ responses to the content were mixed. Most were approving of the ideas, many indicated they lacked experience with LGBTQ content, several expressed concerns about promoting access because of potential negative administrative and/or community response, and a few people said quietly, “I am glad you are here.” That was nice of them to say, but, it would be much better if they didn’t feel the need to speak quietly or if these conversations simply weren’t so problematic. All LGBTQ youth deserve school (and public) librarians who are fully prepared to support them with robust access and effective services.

I am very honored to be nominated for an Excellence in Teaching Award based on significant contributions to teaching and student learning.

This year of teaching has been particularly wonderful because I developed and taught a new graduate LIS course in Community Engagement. This course was designed to explore how information professionals in libraries and other settings collaborate with community members and organizations. It considers theory and practice emphasizing critical analysis of policies, services and trends.

One class assignment involved a semester-long investigation to explore local initiatives. Students connected with organizations to consider community needs and the potential role of LIS in meeting them. For example, one group looked at role of libraries in strengthening the capacities of indigenous peoples and the protection of cultures. Another focused on the availability of programs to foster literacy for young children. A third looked at resources to support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) community members. For their final project, students created a poster to present at the state library conference, which offered the opportunity to extend their understanding through exchange with professional colleagues. This year’s conference theme was, fittingly, Building Community: Opportunities, Challenges, and Innovations. Student posters were also deposited in the institutional repository, ScholarSpace.

Community Engagement students enjoying Banned Books Week Read Out